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The CDC Finds Vitamin E Acetate In Vapes Is The Cause For Lung Issues

The CDC Finds Vitamin E Acetate In Vapes Is The Cause For Lung Issues

The CDC has officially announced it's findings into the cause of vape related lung illnesses in the US. Their findings show that Vitamin E acetate is the culprit. Vitamin E acetate is used as an additive, most notably as a thickening agent in THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products. Vitamin E is a vitamin found in many foods, including vegetable oils, cereals, meat, fruits, and vegetables. It is also available as a dietary supplement and in many cosmetic products, like skin creams. Vitamin E acetate usually does not cause harm when ingested as a vitamin supplement or applied to the skin. However, previous research suggests when vitamin E acetate is inhaled, it may interfere with normal lung functioning.

From The CDC:

The CDC has identified vitamin E acetate as a chemical of concern among people with e-cigarette, or vaping, product use associated lung injury (EVALI). Recent CDC laboratory testing of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples (fluid samples collected from the lungs) from 29 patients with EVALI submitted to CDC from 10 states found vitamin E acetate in all of the samples. Vitamin E acetate is used as an additive, most notably as a thickening agent in THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products.

As of November 20, 2019, 2,290* cases of e-cigarette, or vaping, product use associated lung injury (EVALI) have been reported to CDC from 49 states (all except Alaska), the District of Columbia, and 2 U.S. territories (Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands).

    Forty-seven deaths have been confirmed in 25 states and the District of Columbia (as of November 20, 2019)


While it appears that vitamin E acetate is associated with EVALI, evidence is not yet sufficient to rule out contribution of other chemicals of concern to EVALI.  Many different substances and product sources are still under investigation, and it may be that there is more than one cause of this outbreak.


CDC recommends that people do not use THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products.

    CDC also recommends that people should not:

      Buy any type of e-cigarette, or vaping, products, particularly those containing THC from informal sources like friends, or family, or in-person or online dealers.

      Modify or add any substances to e-cigarette, or vaping, products that are not intended by the manufacturer, including products purchased through retail establishments.

    While it appears that vitamin E acetate is associated with EVALI, evidence is not yet sufficient to rule out contribution of other chemicals of concern to EVALI.

      Many different substances and product sources are still under investigation, and it may be that there is more than one cause of this outbreak.

      The only way to assure that you are not at risk while the investigation continues is to consider refraining from use of all e-cigarette, or vaping, products.

    Adults using e-cigarettes to quit smoking should not go back to smoking; they should weigh all risks and benefits and consider utilizing 

    external icon

    .FDA-approved nicotine replacement therapies

    Adults who continue to use an e-cigarette, or vaping, product, should carefully monitor themselves for symptoms and see a healthcare provider immediately if they develop symptoms like those reported in this outbreak.

    Irrespective of the ongoing investigation:

      E-cigarette, or vaping, products should never be used by youths, young adults, or women who are pregnant.

      Adults who do not currently use tobacco products should not start using e-cigarette, or vaping, products. There is no safe tobacco product. All tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, carry a risk.

      THC use has been associated with a wide range of health effects, particularly with prolonged frequent use. The best way to avoid potentially harmful effects is to not use THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products. Persons with marijuana use disorder should seek evidence-based treatment by a health care provider.

    People who have significant impairment or distress from ongoing problematic use of THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products should seek evidence-based behavioral treatment and recovery services for cannabis use disorder.


Posted by Bob Smith